Readings and Reflections for Wednesday 30 January 2019: Epiphany

Daily Office Readings for 30 January 2019
AM Psalm 119:49-72; PM Psalm 49, [53] Isa. 49:1-12; Gal. 2:11-21; Mark 6:13-29

Part 1of 3
Mark
“For Herod feared John, knowing that he was a righteous and holy man, and he protected him. When he heard him, he was greatly perplexed; and yet he liked to listen to him.” (Mark6:20)

The relationship of Herod with John the Baptist was one of fear, respect, mystery and admiration.  And yet Herod would allow himself to be persuaded into killing John.

With the possible exception of fear, I have mentors of whom I respect and who are mysterious and have my admiration.  They just happen to all be men and priests.  They are men of integrity who always have some silent quality about them that manifest a contemplative quality. I can’t imagine doing anything that would cause them harm.  For that matter, I don’t want to do anything that would harm our relationship. Herod lost a great mentor when allowed too much to drink take away a bright light in his life.

I believe all of us should have some person or persons in our lives that are those who console us. Elisha had Elijah, Ruth had Naomi and Marcella had Jerome (More about Marcella and Jerome later). 

Who do you have?  Regular visits to be with such a person makes you a better person too. We all need someone who could advise us, console us, someone we like to listen to.  Such a person should be honest and a good listener who wants to console and not control. Your mentor should be someone you like to listen to. And someone you want to emulate. I believe that by maintaining this mentor-protégé relationship we grow into being part of the person leading us and keep them with us long after they have gone on. Keep the good ones alive forever.

Let us hear what the Spirit is saying through and to God’s people.

Part 2 of 3

Marcella had Jerome Wednesday Night Healing Service for January 30 2019

Readings for Marcella of Rome

1 Kings 17:8–16 Psalm 124 Mark 12:41–44

1Kings “Elijah said to her, “Don’t be afraid. Go home and do as you have said. But first make a small loaf of bread for me from what you have and bring it to me, and then make something for yourself and your son. For this is what the Lord, the God of Israel, says: ‘The jar of flour will not be used up and the jug of oil will not run dry until the day the Lord sends rain on the land.’” (1 Kings 17:13 -14)

Marcella (325–410) is known primarily for her role in the founding of monasticism. After the death of her husband, she commenced a life of abstinence and many other women in Rome at the time followed suit. (Wikipedia)  Marcella’s day is actually tomorrow, January 31 but I use what I call preacher’s privilege and scan the week to see who I want to lift up on Wednesday night.

Summoned by Pope Damasus I (who arranged lodging at Marcella’s hospitality house), Jerome arrived in Rome in 382. It was an exhilarating time for Marcella, a woman of letters who had immersed herself in both Greek and Hebrew, to be entertaining one of the great minds of the age. Jerome spent the next three years in what he called her “domestic church,” translating the Bible into Latin. She learned under his teaching even as she critiqued his translation. He spoke and wrote of her Christian devotion and scholarship Indeed, his admiration of Marcella was unbounded, not only for her intellectual acumen but also for her deference to men who might be threatened by her vast store of knowledge. (Wikipedia).

The relationship of Marcella and Jerome closely resembles that of Elijah and Elisha as introduced in 1Kings 19: 19 – 21. Elisha gave up everything and followed Elijah.  So, at the risk of redundancy, we all need someone who could advise us, console us, someone we like to listen to.  Such a person should be honest and a good listener who wants to console and not control. Your mentor should be someone you like to listen to. And someone you want to emulate. I believe that by maintaining this mentor-protégé relationship we grow into being part of the person leading us and keep them with us long after they have gone on. Keep the good ones alive forever.

Let us hear what the Spirit is saying through and to God’s people.

Part 3 of 3

Galatians

“And it is no longer I who live, but it is Christ who lives in me. And the life I now live in the flesh I live by faith in the Son of God, who loved me and gave himself for me.” (Galatians 2:20)

I don’t really think it would be hard to let Jesus live in us.  We know so much about Jesus.  He would not hurt anybody.  He would feed people and it seems he really loved being at the table with friends. He was not impressed with money and could be found praying at any time of day. He would listen to anybody and only gave loving advice. 

These are traits that we can emulate: don’t hurt, feed people, be company, don’t let money rule you, listen quietly, and pray regularly.  Let’s do this starting right now.

Let us hear what the Spirit is saying through and to God’s people.

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